volume 2
volume 2

In this issue we explore inheritance as an event that happens between persons, within communities. Because etymology speaks to us of inheritance, and allows us to get to our roots, we chose as our theme for this issue the etymology of convivium itself: com (together) + vivere (to live)

Inheritance is not a process that unfolds in the abstract, but always invites the question of “who is giving?” or “who is receiving?” And further questions: is it possible to draw a stark line between the one and the other? Is the event possible simply as an exchange or is a wider circle of companions intimated?

volume 2
   root and twig      Our first issue features the theme  root and twig , which challenges us to discover the different ways we encounter rootedness, growth, connection - the bonds between ancient and new, large and small - traditions and heritages of labor, family, or culture.     The summer 2017 issue  of  convivium   has arrived! Featuring the theme  root and twig , it presents original poems by Joanna Penn Cooper, John Farrell, Bruno Cassarà, Lilianna Meldrum Serbicki, R. Bratten Weiss, Michael Delp, Elisabeth Beasley Kramp, and Michael Martin; short fiction by Pellegrine Deuel; essays by Meghan Berneking and David Russell Mosley; and photographs by Sharon Mollerus. 
volume 2

In this issue we explore inheritance as an event that happens between persons, within communities. Because etymology speaks to us of inheritance, and allows us to get to our roots, we chose as our theme for this issue the etymology of convivium itself: com (together) + vivere (to live)

Inheritance is not a process that unfolds in the abstract, but always invites the question of “who is giving?” or “who is receiving?” And further questions: is it possible to draw a stark line between the one and the other? Is the event possible simply as an exchange or is a wider circle of companions intimated?

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